A scientist in church?

My college degree was quantitative economics, which is useful when I’m pitching commercial solar deals and discussing ROI projections, accelerated depreciation, and projected kilowatt output on a 1000 panel solar array.

I’ve also had to develop some basic scientific knowledge about photovoltaics, power inverters and the basic engineering that integrates solar with the power grid.

My Monday through Saturday activity is firmly grounded in math and science, yet every Sunday I find myself at the local Methodist church. I attend an old-timey service where they still sing hymns from the hymn book. My Mom sings in the choir and Dad runs the audio-visual, so I get to see my parents as well. I like the traditional service, even though I’m probably 20 years younger than most of the folks who attend.

For a long time I rejected faith because I felt it contradicted the theories of Darwin, carbon dating, paleontology and many other hard sciences. Modern science states that the soul does not exist, we are just primates responding to chemical stimuli and electronic impulses firing from neuron to neuron.

I think there is much more than that. 

I can’t hold a baby in my arms and not believe in love, and connectedness, and a wider theory of the universe. Hence the picture above.

I don’t think science is wrong, but I believe that there are far more things that scientists have NOT discovered yet that will show evidence of a (multi-dimensional?) plane that we have no way to measure right now.

In 1850 the best scientists in the world had no clue about the nature of radiation, radio waves, viral infections, or even what was on the other side of the moon. The periodic table was only partially complete! Einstein’s theory of special relativity was 60 years away from being discovered.

I think that our current scientific understanding of the connection between all living things is at 1850 levels right now. Scientists can’t measure the love that a mother has for her child. They can’t measure the connection between a group of friends laughing about a shared experience.

This energy binds us and connects us in a very real way. We are connected to our family, our pets, even the stranger who rings up our order at the grocery store.

This concept of connection, or love, was one of the main teachings of Christ.

I don’t have all the answers here, there are clear conflicts between what is written in scripture and what we have learned in the laboratory, but I know that we are all on this journey together.

And if we can channel MORE love, and MORE compassion for our fellow humans?

That’s not a bad thing at all.

Ben Alexander

June . 2017